I Ought To Be In Pictures

[vc_row row_height_percent=”30″ override_padding=”yes” h_padding=”2″ top_padding=”2″ bottom_padding=”2″ back_color=”color-148591″ overlay_alpha=”50″ gutter_size=”3″ shift_y=”0″][vc_column column_width_percent=”85″ override_padding=”yes” column_padding=”2″ overlay_alpha=”50″ gutter_size=”3″ medium_width=”0″ shift_x=”0″ shift_y=”0″ z_index=”0″ width=”1/1″][vc_single_image media=”45049″ media_lightbox=”yes” media_width_percent=”51″ media_ratio=”two-three” alignment=”center” shape=”img-round” css_animation=”alpha-anim” animation_delay=”200″][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_height_percent=”30″ override_padding=”yes” h_padding=”2″ top_padding=”2″ bottom_padding=”2″ back_color=”color-148591″ overlay_alpha=”50″ gutter_size=”3″ shift_y=”0″][vc_column column_width_percent=”85″ position_vertical=”middle” align_horizontal=”align_center” override_padding=”yes” column_padding=”2″ back_image=”44928″ back_repeat=”no-repeat” parallax=”yes” overlay_color=”color-wvjs” overlay_alpha=”70″ gutter_size=”3″ medium_width=”0″ shift_x=”0″ shift_y=”0″ z_index=”0″ width=”1/1″][vc_custom_heading heading_semantic=”h3″ text_size=”h4″ text_weight=”400″ text_color=”color-xsdn” sub_reduced=”yes”]It’s 1980 and struggling screenwriter Herbert Tucker suddenly finds his estranged 19-year-old daughter Libby has hitchhiked to Hollywood and landed on his doorstep. After sixteen years of disconnection, Libby sweeps into Herb’s home, convinced that he can give her the silver screen acting career she desires, and demands the love and fatherly guidance he owes her. With the isolation of his California bungalow disturbed, Herb is forced to deal with the realities of fatherhood, and a renewed sense of direction that may affect his relationship with his on-again-off-again girlfriend Steffy. This funny and heartwarming story from one of America’s most renowned playwrights proves that even the most dysfunctional families can undergo astounding transformations.[/vc_custom_heading][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_height_percent=”0″ back_color=”color-148591″ overlay_alpha=”50″ gutter_size=”3″ shift_y=”0″][vc_column column_width_percent=”100″ expand_height=”yes” override_padding=”yes” column_padding=”2″ overlay_alpha=”50″ gutter_size=”3″ medium_width=”0″ shift_x=”0″ shift_y=”0″ z_index=”0″ width=”1/1″][vc_gallery el_id=”gallery-116036″ type=”carousel” medias=”44930,44929,44928,44927,44952,44953,44925,44954″ gallery_back_color=”color-148591″ carousel_lg=”4″ carousel_md=”2″ carousel_sm=”1″ thumb_size=”one-one” gutter_size=”3″ media_items=”media|lightbox|original” carousel_height=”equal” carousel_interval=”3000″ carousel_navspeed=”400″ single_back_color=”color-148591″ single_shape=”round” single_style=”dark” single_overlay_color=”color-xsdn” single_overlay_opacity=”50″ single_padding=”2″ single_text_reduced=”yes” lbox_no_arrows=”yes”][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row row_height_percent=”0″ back_color=”color-148591″ overlay_alpha=”50″ gutter_size=”3″ shift_y=”0″][vc_column column_width_percent=”100″ style=”light” back_image=”44953″ back_repeat=”no-repeat” parallax=”yes” overlay_color=”color-wvjs” overlay_alpha=”76″ gutter_size=”3″ medium_width=”0″ shift_x=”0″ shift_y=”0″ z_index=”0″ width=”1/1″][vc_column_text css_animation=”zoom-out” animation_delay=”200″]Joy, like her name implies, is a ray of sunshine. The role was originally played by Dinah Manoff, who portrayed Libby as a typically brash Brooklyn Jewish girl. Joy makes Libby completely her own, deftly exposing the intense vulnerability that lies beneath a tough veneer of self-confidence.

-BROADWAY WORLD  (See Entire Article)

 

It is Genevieve Joy (Libby) who runs away with the play. Her spontaneity, natural charm and wit give the play vulnerability, vibrancy and truth. She is the driving force behind this piece.

-NORTH HOLLYWOOD PATCH  (See Entire Article)

 

Dinah Manoff starred as Libby at the Ahmanson on Broadway and “In Pictures” as well, a role which Falcon newcomer Joy now assumes to memorable effect.  Though Joy’s background in standup and sketch comedy is far removed from Manoff’s Actors Studio training, she makes for about as splendid a Libby as any audience could wish for, not only giving her spunk, chutzpah, and bravado, but revealing a teenager’s fragile, needy soul beneath. Wuhl and Joy are terrific together, and keep getting better and better the deeper into the play (and their relationship) we get.

-STAGE SCENE LA (See Entire Article)

 

Libby and Dad came together in a playful relationship in the changing and sometimes delicate and subtle emotions delivered by Wuhl and Joy.  All accomplished in a manner that had an audience rooting for their attachment.

-TOLUCAN TIMES (See Entire Article)[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]